Projects Highlight Air Quality, Energy Efficiency, and Comfort Goals

 

The EPA ranks indoor air quality (IAQ) as a top-five environmental risk to public health

On average, Americans spend over 90 percent of their time indoors where concentrations of some pollutants can be two to five times higher than typical outdoor concentrations, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In fact, the EPA ranks indoor air quality (IAQ) as a top-five environmental risk to public health while the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that approximately 1.4 million buildings in the U.S. have indoor air problems.

Back-to-School Strategies: Using Indoor Air Quality to Improve Academic Performance

 

With the school season in full swing at colleges and universities, the last thing on their minds is that the indoor air could be impacting their students' health and performance. Yet, studies show that most schools have inadequate indoor air quality (IAQ) and that this results in increased health issues and lower student performance. Symptoms like headache, dizziness, and tiredness were found to be higher in classrooms with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide, as well as increased difficulty concentrating.

Developing Greener Buildings with Zero Incremental Costs

 

With the building sector responsible for nearly 48 percent of all energy consumption in the U.S. and global warming the subject of heated national discourse, commercial building developers are under growing pressure to make a difficult choice – produce the best possible financial outcomes, or increase their building costs to boost energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions.

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How to get best financial outcome while “going green”

 

With energy use in commercial buildings accounting for nearly 20% of total U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year, and global warming the heated subject of national discourse, the sector is under growing pressure to make a difficult decision – produce the best financial outcomes, or increase their building costs to “go green” and boost energy efficiency to reduce carbon emissions.

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